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gun shot camera

Article about: Harry, I stand corrected - you are indeed right in your thinking. Thank you for putting me on the straight and narrow! Cheers

  1. #1

    Default gun shot camera

    opinions on this please guys Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2

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    One of these came up for auction this past month. The one on the auction had more to it than this one appears. i don't know much about these, but the one auctioned went for what I would say quite a bit.

    John
    I specialize in M1 carbines and Lugers.

  3. #3

    Default

    I saw one of these for sale a good while ago. If I remember correctly they were actually intended as a training aid for aerial gunners in the RFC. But other people have said they were also used for photographing targets. But I doubt if they would be much good for that kind of work. I believe they used 120 roll film in the camera.
    Author of... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack: Andersonstown.. Voices From 9 Battery Royal Artillery In Northern Ireland'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.

  4. #4

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    Quote by HARRY THE MOLE View Post
    I saw one of these for sale a good while ago. If I remember correctly they were actually intended as a training aid for aerial gunners in the RFC. But other people have said they were also used for photographing targets. But I doubt if they would be much good for that kind of work. I believe they used 120 roll film in the camera.
    Actually, not so sure about this type. I think they were designed to look like guns so that the EA did not necessarily think they were recon and taking photos.

    Training types I believe were a lot shorter.

    I'd love one.

    Edit: I think I may stand to be corrected. Sorry.

    Cheers

  5. #5

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    There is also a Mk111. They were designed to take a Lewis drum so that the trainee gunner could also practice changing magazines as well as 'firing' at a target. As all allied spotters carried a few Lewis guns, I don't think a camera disguised as a gun would fool E/A. It is likely that any two seater would be treated as a spotter. And for taking pictures of the ground they would be practically useless if you think of the problems of pointing the camera gun at the ground. large plate camera's were the norm for that kind of work!

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    If you google Hythe machine gun camera it will give you all the information you need on this training aid.
    Author of... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack: Andersonstown.. Voices From 9 Battery Royal Artillery In Northern Ireland'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.

  6. #6

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    harry is right in what he said.

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote by harryamb2 View Post
    harry is right in what he said.
    Gentlemen,

    While I agree that large plate cameras were the norm, they were certainly not the only type of cameras used and consequently, I tend to disagree - but for the life of me I'm unable to find the photo's I'm looking for.

    However, I have included this link:

    The History of Aerial Photography - Northstar Imaging

    which does show that even pigeons were used in the taking photos...so not quite as preposterous as one may think.

    Cheers
    Tim

  8. #8

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    Hi Tim,

    I'm not sure if you are disagreeing with what you have been told about the Mk111 gun camera, but it really is only a training aid. Better equipment was available for photographing the trenches. it was never designed or intended for such work.
    Author of... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack: Andersonstown.. Voices From 9 Battery Royal Artillery In Northern Ireland'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.

  9. #9

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    A picture of one in use posted on another forum by Martin W. He is very up on cameras and stated that they were for training pilots in aerial combat using film to check the accuracy of their shooting.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Regards,

    Jerry

    Whatever its just an opinion.

  10. #10

    Default

    There are some very interesting articles to be found on the web about this gun camera. As well as being used to train pilots in gunnery it was also used by trainee observers. It actually remained in service until 1934! The camera shutter was cocked by pulling back on the cocking handle of the gun - just as on the proper Lewis. The shutter was activated by squeezing the trigger. The cameral lens was marked similar to a gun sight, and this would show up on the print to give an indication of the accuracy of the trainee. Every time the drum magazine was changed a hole was punched in the film to show that the trainee had carried out the magazine change.

    Similar systems as this to train in the art of gunnery and small-arms shooting are still in use to this day. Back in the early 70's in Germany, our regiment had an astrodome where we would take in one of our Bofors guns (minus barrel) and practice shooting at communist aircraft. The system consisted of a video tape player and a array of mirrors which projected the film onto the inside of the dome. The gunner in the number 3 seat would track the image while the instructor would sit in the number 2 seat and assess his accuracy. Another variation of this was a conversion kit which took the bore of an SLR rifle down to .22 cal. A film would be played onto a large cinema-type screen, and the rifleman would fire when he identified an enemy on the screen. The film would stop as soon as the weapon was fired and a shaft of light would show through where the bullet had struck.
    Author of... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack: Andersonstown.. Voices From 9 Battery Royal Artillery In Northern Ireland'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.

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