Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 15

Post-WW1 Industrialized Gas Masks

Article about: I don't know if it's exactly appropriate for this forum, but I would like to show you guys what happened to a lot of American gas masks after WW1. As you may know, by the end of the war chem

  1. #1

    Default Post-WW1 Industrialized Gas Masks

    I don't know if it's exactly appropriate for this forum, but I would like to show you guys what happened to a lot of American gas masks after WW1.

    As you may know, by the end of the war chemical protection development was moving forward very quickly, and many mask designs became outdated within a few years of their conception. This led to many masks being pushed onto the civilian market at low prices. Some, like the KTM masks, survived relatively intact, only having their military filters replaced with industrial ones. As you can see, the grey filtera were usually removed and replaced with ones more suitable for industrial usage. Instead of being in the bag mounted on the user's chest, the mask would have been held in a box, mounted on a wall, until it was needed. The straps leading off to the left of the industrial KTM shown are a harness to hold it onto the user's chest. The photo on the left is from gasmasklexikon.com, unfortunately the owner Johannes Moller passed away several years ago. On the right is my photo, although the mask shown was originally his.
    Name:  KTM.01..jpg
Views: 182
Size:  44.8 KBClick image for larger version. 

Name:	tumblr_o7yyhy4I5o1tapd64o1_1280.jpg 
Views:	67 
Size:	116.8 KB 
ID:	991320


    In this next example, we can see the same process, except this time with an earlier Akron Tissot (AT) mask. Unfortunately, AT masks are very hard to find in any condition (even hard-as-a-brick, like mine) and there's not a lot of photos of them. The one on the left is owned by an old "friend" (the same one that sold me a fake Hypo). The one in the middle is actually mine, I believe it's old owner posted it on here once, and on the right is simply a period advertisement.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	14012320_1662293110755155_205654618_o.jpg 
Views:	78 
Size:	224.4 KB 
ID:	991325Click image for larger version. 

Name:	P1040176.jpg 
Views:	82 
Size:	219.7 KB 
ID:	991326Click image for larger version. 

Name:	VICOTR.PNG 
Views:	41 
Size:	55.5 KB 
ID:	991327

    Some of the earlier masks, like the CEM and RFK designs, however, were not so lucky in being industrialized. Many of them were stripped down to their key components, namely the mouthpiece/flapper valve assembly and noseclips. This practice apparently carried on for many years, and saw some revisions, as we can tell from how the noseclips on the example mask to the left seem do not match the CEM design. It is also of interest that plastic versions of these mouthpiece kits have been found. (Once again, the mask on the left is from Mr. Moller's website.)
    Name:  USA-0002(01).jpg
Views: 144
Size:  29.2 KBClick image for larger version. 

Name:	P1040172.jpg 
Views:	41 
Size:	215.0 KB 
ID:	991329

    My final example is a strange one, and we're not entirely sure of it's actual origins. I'd like to ask your opinions on it's composure, and would be more than willing to provide additional photographs if needed. What it appears to be is a full-face mask from the mid 1920's that has parts salvaged from the CEM/RFK style masks. The hose, flapper valve and the black angled connection tube all bear a resemblance to military parts.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	tumblr_obo1snaSj61tapd64o1_1280.jpg 
Views:	78 
Size:	125.1 KB 
ID:	991330

    If you would like more photos of any of these masks, or have any questions/comments, I'd love to hear them. A lot of what I do is theoretical and I don't mind being contradicted.


  2. #2

    Default

    Hi Moulage...I think its very appropriate and educational

    Your data and photo support are outstanding !

    Regards Larry
    It is not the size of a Collection in History that matters......Its the size of your Passion for it!! - Larry C

    One never knows what tree roots push to the surface of what laid buried before the tree was planted - Larry C

    “The farther back you can look, the farther forward you are likely to see.” - Winston Churchill

  3. #3

    Default

    Glad you enjoyed it!

  4. #4
    MAP
    MAP is online now
    ?

    Default

    Very interesting thread. Thanks!
    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  5. #5

    Default

    I also like these threads on post war use of items , it gives you a understanding of why you can still find these items today

  6. #6

    Default

    Though not directly post WW1, here's a WW2 equivalent

  7. #7

    Default

    René, do you own that example? Those are very rare, I've only seen one other. Australian masks in general are hard to find, but that one is rather illusive on documentation.

    Thanks.

  8. #8

    Default

    Moulage,
    Thank you for feeding my habit!
    Gas masks were one of the very first things that caught my interest and led me into this hobby.
    I have since "branched out" to a lot of different items, but my gas masks remain some of my most priced possessions.

    In Denmark something similar almost happened.
    During the 1920s, the "Gas Commission of 1922" discussed the civilian use of outdated gas masks and anti-gas equipment in general.
    However they decided to start from scratch and design several "civilian" and "industrial" masks, that the Army sold through private companies.
    E.g.: the "M.1931 C.", the "M.1938 Civilgasmaske" and the "M.1938 G. Civilgasmaske".
    The old WWI equipment was deemed insufficient and potential dangerous.

    However this stance changed. In the late 1940s a lot of surplus German WWII masks were used by fire departments and was found in civilian hands. Sold off from government stocks (taken from the German occupational forces).

    Again, thank you for sharing!
    Πόλεμος πάντων μεν πατήρ εστί, πάντων δε βασιλεύς.

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote by Moulage View Post
    René, do you own that example? Those are very rare, I've only seen one other. Australian masks in general are hard to find, but that one is rather illusive on documentation.

    Thanks.
    Cheers Moulage yes it is in my collection this set utilizes a 42 dated US mask
    Last edited by reneblacky; 08-22-2016 at 08:55 AM. Reason: added pic changed text

  10. #10

    Default

    Great thread,are the first 2 images in fact the US M1 series mask?just thought i would ask as the face and bracket exhale vale and 6 point harness are basically the same,Rene you have an M3A1 Diaphragm,good stuff and very informative indeed.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. 3 old Gas Masks

    In Collections display
    06-16-2014, 12:22 AM
  2. Gas masks

    In Collections display
    03-24-2014, 06:42 AM
  3. gas masks

    In Equipment and Field gear
    01-28-2012, 09:01 PM
  4. help with I.D for these 2 gas masks

    In Equipment and Field gear
    07-27-2011, 02:06 PM
  5. 03-12-2009, 12:37 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •