Virtual Grenadier - Top
Display your banner here
Results 1 to 6 of 6

A Brazilian

Article about: ...now I just KNEW you'd have a peek with that title!!! Unknown Brazilian-made thing. It's the same as those on the marvellous "CompoSite" BUT rivet positioning is different. 'any

  1. #1

    Default A Brazilian

    ...now I just KNEW you'd have a peek with that title!!!

    Unknown Brazilian-made thing. It's the same as those on the marvellous "CompoSite" BUT rivet positioning is different.

    'any Brazilian experts out there? (Ade, get ready to delete some Posts!)

    A BrazilianA BrazilianA BrazilianA Brazilian

  2. #2

    Default

    I've already told Adrian all this, but others may be interested; I did some research on this GLASPAC company and they seem to have done one or two models (I personally believe Adrian's and those on CompoSite are essentially the same thing) in the 1980s/maybe90s. Nothing widely used and very little trace of their activity in either English or Portuguese. Pre-internet really so no web presence at that time.

    Their main concern seems to have been fibre-glass car parts and accessories and (I forget now) they may still be active in that area today. It all reminds me of UK company Bristol Armour which did a bit of not much and then vanished from helmetworld. I'd say this is an excellent example of a pretty uncommon helmet. Not bad for next to nothing.

  3. #3

    Default

    Here's some more, from German Wikipedia(!) -

    "Indústria de Plástico Reforçado Glaspac Ltda. was a Brazilian manufacturer of automobiles . The company was founded in São Paulo in 1961 to manufacture plastics . In 1968, the production of automobiles and kit cars began under a license from Meyers Manx . The brand name was GlasPac . In 1987 automobile production ended. "

    From my investigations pretty much everything ended for GLASPAC in the late 80s. And I note that I intended to write "...in the 1970s/maybe80s." in my previous posting but managed to confuse myself and shunt on a decade.

    All this does make me wonder how many companies in the general artificial fibre business tried their hand at these new-fangled not-metal helmets, and how many saw them as just rather upgraded industrial safety helmets. After all in those days there wasn't the much more sophisticated materials technology of today (think of the Bristol Brick), much less the much stronger and more rigorously applied standards of protection. It's slightly perverse that some early 'compos' would probably not pass today's requirements whearas some steel helmets might (just).

    I think part of this comes down to the fact that given access to the right materials and some comparatively simple equipment producing a composite (of perhaps doubtful quality) is actually a garden-shed proposition, wheras a steel helmet is a much more complex affair in all directions. I mean, have you seen some of the photos/videos of compo production lines - hardly 'industrial' in the old sense at all.

  4. #4
    ?

    Default

    Thanks for the interesting thread,I briefly worked for a Rowing Skiff builder in NZ around 1988.
    It was really interesting to see the different fibres utilized in the construction of the boats.
    The owner had a few side projects going as well but sadly no helmets.
    I was later told he had served with a very particular unit.
    I am sure his passion was boats and I remember a lunchtime comment about the Aluminum superstructures of the RN ships used in the Falklands Conflict.
    He knew a bit about the DDR adaptation of Third Reich era boat design too,updated into the 70's with more modern materials but I guess a composite M56
    was pretty low down the list of priorities for a country that obtained most of it's international recognition from it's ruthless pursuit of Sports victories.
    Sorry for the rambling,the helmet might at least appreciate a delicate application of Renaissance Wax in the appropriate areas.

  5. #5

    Default

    Thank you. The most it will get will be an annual wipe-over with a dry cloth.

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote by Composite View Post
    Thank you. The most it will get will be an annual wipe-over with a dry cloth.
    Jeeze I'm lazy! annual, what's that mean?
    Regards
    René

Similar Threads

  1. Can someone confirm these are indeed Brazilian bajonets?

    In Bayonets and trench knives of the world
    07-16-2019, 10:48 AM
  2. Brazilian caps

    In Cloth headgear-Western Allies
    05-24-2019, 11:04 PM
  3. Brazilian Swords

    In Edged weapons
    12-15-2017, 11:24 AM
  4. 07-10-2017, 04:30 AM
  5. 07-04-2017, 08:07 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Military Antiques Stockholm - Down
Display your banner here