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The Future of our Hobby Part II (legislation)

Article about: I noticed the previous thread about the future of our hobby went off topic into something political and got closed down. This is in my opinion a shame because the topic concerns all of us. I

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    Default The Future of our Hobby Part II (legislation)

    I noticed the previous thread about the future of our hobby went off topic into something political and got closed down.
    This is in my opinion a shame because the topic concerns all of us. I stated that I believe there are three pillars threatening our hobby with number one threat being governmental legislation.
    Several days after me posting this, a new law went into effect in Australia:

    "Australia to introduce national ban on Nazi symbols"
    Australia to introduce national ban on Nazi symbols - BBC News


    My first reaction was: "there we go, again". Luckily not living in Australia due my dislike for warm weather and large bugs.
    The true consequences of this new path hit me I was watching the new Thomas Wittmann - Down the cellar video # 78. > Down the Cellar 78 - Home Again - YouTube ( 14:58 )
    A gentleman from said Australia purchased a SS-Oberführer greatcoat which was shipped over. After inspection at Australian customs it arrived at the collectors house in this shape:

    ssovercaot.JPG
    ssovercaot2.JPG

    An overzealous customs officer took liberty to deface and 'denazify' this greatcoat.
    Absolutely brutalizing the coat. This counts as a warning for anyone shipping the expensive stuff.
    Let's hope this madness does not pass over from down under. I feel for the collectors there if this becomes the norm.

    Last edited by Larry C; 06-19-2023 at 01:42 PM.

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    That is insane ! Overzealous tyrants destroying private property. There is no turning back once these boundaries are crossed.
    Regards, Al

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    That's taking liberties beyond a pay grade. You surely can't deface a historical item that cost thousands based upon what appears to be personal prejudice.
    That's not banning a symbol, it's wanton destruction.
    If a symbol is banned it should be impounded, returned to sender or the buyer prove it is for historical interest only.
    I hope the buyer has taken some sort of action against the individuals involved because that is completely unreasonable.
    Does that mean that Australia will remove any such artifacts from it's museums?

    Looking for LDO marked EK2s and items relating to U-406.....

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    Quote by Adrian View Post
    That's taking liberties beyond a pay grade. You surely can't deface a historical item that cost thousands based upon what appears to be personal prejudice.
    That's not banning a symbol, it's wanton destruction.
    If a symbol is banned it should be impounded, returned to sender or the buyer prove it is for historical interest only.
    I hope the buyer has taken some sort of action against the individuals involved because that is completely unreasonable.
    Does that mean that Australia will remove any such artifacts from it's museums?
    Adrian, from what I’ve read, museums are exempt from these new laws. The issue for me is that when I do get to the stage where I need to let my collection go, I will be stuck with helmets etc worth thousands of dollars that can’t be re-homed. Either that or my wife will. So, for that reason I will shortly be starting to sell off most of my TR collection. At least I can still collect imperial items, but it still all very sad especially considering the right wing groups here are never seen with any Nazi regalia and wouldn’t know the difference between an M42 and a Brodie helmet.

    Andy

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    It is entirely possible that the customs officials didn't realise this was an original piece of uniform. We collectors do often forget that not everyone shares the same level of interest and expertise with these things as we do, and to an untrained eye something like this may be perceived as just some neo-Nazi's fancy dress costume, which would understandably cause some revulsion. It may be necessary in future to post such things with a note or letter confirming the object's originality, much as inert ordnance in the UK is posted with a piece of paper confirming the contents are free from explosives. It's not going to have any legally binding effect, but it may be enough to prevent future incidents of vandalism.

    I also wonder whether this has anything to do with Australia's new laws at all, or if it's simply the result of someone overreacting and doing it in the spur of the moment. Completely inexcusable either way, and the buyer of the coat should definitely not let this go.

    B.B.

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    Doesn't matter if the agent knew it was real or not item should not have been. Damaged. Technically the item would have been evidence of a crime if they believed the law was being broken. This was an individual act by an individual who should be prosecuted and disciplined. There job is to report violations of law not destroy items.

    Hopefully some sanity develops someday.


    Really a shame
    Tim

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    My understanding is that the new laws being introduced in Australia will allow private individuals to still own Nazi militaria, but they will not be allowed to sell or buy them in future.

    Cheers,
    Steve

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    If that was my coat, I would have tracked down the customs officer and the cops would have another 187... Now, these bans are nothing new, they're just spreading. It has always been like that in Germany and France. When a dealer sends items from the US to Germany, there is always a great danger that customs will intercept the items and confiscate them, and that the cops will show up and arrest the collector. In Germany, such "offences" are punishable by up to three years in prison. The legal situation there is totally confused. You can purchase and own these TR things within Germany. They can also be sold, but only under the condition that the buyer uses them exclusively for historical research. You are not allowed to show them in public, otherwise three years in prison. You should also make sure that if you exhibit them in a collector's room, for example, this is not visible from outside the house, cause a nice neighbor could call the cops and they would storm your house, confiscate everything and you go to jail.

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    A sad sight of a destroyed coat... The worst is an initiative jerk...

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    Hi,
    a similar law is being discussed in my country and we don't have any kangaroos in Austria! ...

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