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Show your WW2 Kukri

Article about: WW2 dated or attributed Kukri’s are relatively scarce, I’m lucky enough to have three plus a bone handled kukri that was allegedly from WW2. The two ‘41 dated kukris were brought back

  1. #1

    Default Show your WW2 Kukri

    WW2 dated or attributed Kukri’s are relatively scarce, I’m lucky enough to have three plus a bone handled kukri that was allegedly from WW2.
    The two ‘41 dated kukris were brought back by my uncles uncle (more info here WW2 1945 British Jungle Greens)
    The ‘43 dated kukri was bought at auction and attributed to a soldier who was in the 26th Indian Bgde, in 1944.
    The bone handled kukri was given to me by a friend (in exchange for some eggs!). It has what looks like “1943” and a name written in pencil on the scabbard, however, it is very faint. Apparently it was brought back from the Far East after WW2, I suspect that it was a market pick up, however, it is much better made than most souvenir pieces that I have seen.
    I’d be interested to see any other WW2 kukris, I think after the FS dagger it is my favourite knife (you can forget your German daggers, they were just for show)
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Show your WW2 Kukri   Show your WW2 Kukri  

    Show your WW2 Kukri   Show your WW2 Kukri  

    Show your WW2 Kukri  

  2. #2

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    Quote by Grimebox View Post
    (you can forget your German daggers, they were just for show)


    Very nice collection.
    I wish I had one to post. I've got a 1914 and one that is not dated. I'll try and find that one
    to see if I can match it to a time frame.
    gregM
    Live to ride -- Ride to live

    I was addicted to the "Hokey-Pokey" but I've turned
    myself around.

  3. #3
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    Agree with Chopperman, very nice collection and I too wish I had one, it is on my want list, have not had much luck with one yet.

  4. #4

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    They’re clearly rarer than I thought!

  5. #5
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    No markings on this one but I got it from the original owners family along with his Army Book 64 and other bits - he started as a Scots Guard, transferred to RASC and went with them to India Command, his RASC Company was with the Chindits (not sure if he served on one of their expeditions), when he returned to the UK he joined 250 (Airborne) Coy RASC but I think this was as a post Arnhem replacement


    Show your WW2 Kukri

  6. #6

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    A have got a lot of Kukri's in at work in the past six years. How many of these were actually military issue? None! They are really hard to find.
    Had good advice? Saved money? Why not become a Gold Club Member, just hit the green "Join WRF Club" tab at the top of the page and help support the forum!

  7. #7

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    My military Kukri looks very much like the one in the picture (3rd from the left)
    The blade is marked /l\ I and the handle is stamped 1914.

    I found my unmarked one which is very similar in size and weight however the
    tang is not full width, it narrows down and passes through the hollow handle instead of
    having handle slabs. I am confident that it's not a military piece.
    Last edited by Chopperman; 09-25-2021 at 04:49 AM.
    gregM
    Live to ride -- Ride to live

    I was addicted to the "Hokey-Pokey" but I've turned
    myself around.

  8. #8

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    Were any made in England for officers or others? Years ago I encountered two interesting knives with one of them being a high quality "Kyber Knife" (Hughes and Jenkins part two #129). Something that they said was probably designed by a commanding officer for the use of his officers. The other a high quality Kukri with a two strap carry harness/attachment that was devoid of ornamentation. The complete assembly looking like it could have been made by a quality English maker - and reminiscent of the "Sam Browne" leather scabbards/straps for swords circa 1901. Best Regards, Fred

  9. #9
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    A good WW2 Kukri site that has decent amount of information on these hard to find knives.

  10. #10

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    Thanks for the link to the website that does give me some more information. And raises some more questions as well because some of the details are difficult to see (this is NOT a complaint as I'm very grateful for the help). The Kukri I saw had brass fittings and used a peened ferrule at the end of the tang. The leather hanging attachment had about seven or eight rows of eyelets and there was no evidence that there was ever a metal end fitting for the bottom of the scabbard. The small accessories were also IMO exceptionally well made with the thickest sharpening steel that I think I have ever seen. I also found another reference for the Kyber knife in the book by Hughes, Jenkins, and Buerlein in the miscellaneous section as figure 11-5. There was also a sword that was very different from any that I have seen previously. That being a mid-19th century British light cavalry officer's sword by Wilkinson - but with an Indian style Tulwar blade. Best Regards, Fred

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