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British army hoe 1941

Article about: by Watchdog That is a 1908 Pattern (WWII dated obviously) "Tool Entrenching" often referred to in equipment tables as a Mattock. The later pattern most seen in the WWII context has

  1. #11

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    Quote by vegetius View Post
    Sticks encouraging or sticks -pain assisted learning. Remember, pain is an orgasm of the brain so enjoy it while you can!
    As my instructors told me "pain is a sensation and a sensation should be enjoyed"
    "War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. A man who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing he cares more about than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature with no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."

  2. #12

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    Quote by vegetius View Post
    The glorious personal defence weapon of many a guard duty!
    You were lucky... we only got pick helves!
    Author of... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack: Andersonstown.. Voices From 9 Battery Royal Artillery In Northern Ireland'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.... 'A Salford Pal: Pte Thomas Jay.'

  3. #13

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    That's the downside of being a 'Long Range Drop Short' Harry. We even got full length handles on the ultimate training weapon, the BUMPER! What a moral boost an hour in the guardroom with one of those was!

  4. #14

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    Quote by vegetius View Post
    That's the downside of being a 'Long Range Drop Short' Harry. We even got full length handles on the ultimate training weapon, the BUMPER! What a moral boost an hour in the guardroom with one of those was!
    The memories flood back of the modified bumper with a half length handle that meant you had to bend at the waist with your legs apart to use it. The body postion and short handle reduced the momentum you could achieve and reduced efficiency by about 50%. You didn't want to do much of that I can say!

    For those who don't know what we are going on about the attached pics should give an idea. The one in the newspaper clip is a civilian lighter weight version. I think the military one in the photo weighed about 12 pounds. I can still smell the heady scent of spirit based wax polish! Oh happy days
    I think if I saw a military bumber for sale on a fair I would have to buy it just for the nostalgia and the tales to the grand kids it would inspire

    British army hoe 1941British army hoe 1941

    Anyway I think we are far enough off topic now to have confused everyone so I won't say anymore unless we think we should have this kind of "corrective training" in it's own thread. Might be a laugh?

    Regards

    Mark
    "War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. A man who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing he cares more about than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature with no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."

  5. #15

    Thumbs up

    Thanks for posting the pics of your nice 'find'. Doubtless many collectors might consider this a rather humble collectable but I for one appreciate seeing it amongst the more esoteric items on the WRF.
    Back in my schooldays, the local 'Army Surplus Shop' used to sell these for literally shillings but now I see nice ones at militaria fairs fetching some surprising prices. I have both early and late types in my collection with their webbing covers - they were an essential piece British soldiers' kit and I like them.....

  6. #16

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    Quote by Martin Bull View Post
    Thanks for posting the pics of your nice 'find'. Doubtless many collectors might consider this a rather humble collectable but I for one appreciate seeing it amongst the more esoteric items on the WRF.
    Back in my schooldays, the local 'Army Surplus Shop' used to sell these for literally shillings but now I see nice ones at militaria fairs fetching some surprising prices. I have both early and late types in my collection with their webbing covers - they were an essential piece British soldiers' kit and I like them.....
    Yep, much overlooked and underated but totally essential just as they are today in their current evolution. Every single soldier had one but many people these days don't even notice them. Each one found "in the wild" represents an indiviual soldier just as much as a steel helmet does and was almost certainly used for it's intended purpose

    Regards

    Mark
    "War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. A man who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing he cares more about than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature with no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."

  7. #17
    ?

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    Quote by Martin Bull View Post
    Thanks for posting the pics of your nice 'find'. Doubtless many collectors might consider this a rather humble collectable but I for one appreciate seeing it amongst the more esoteric items on the WRF.
    Back in my schooldays, the local 'Army Surplus Shop' used to sell these for literally shillings but now I see nice ones at militaria fairs fetching some surprising prices. I have both early and late types in my collection with their webbing covers - they were an essential piece British soldiers' kit and I like them.....
    Thank you, from time to time it happens to find objects that belonged to armies that fought in Italy. these finds are not always recognized.

  8. #18

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    Quote by vegetius View Post
    That's the downside of being a 'Long Range Drop Short' Harry. We even got full length handles on the ultimate training weapon, the BUMPER! What a moral boost an hour in the guardroom with one of those was!
    How dare you? Wash your mouth out! Field artillery was for those who couldn't shoot straight... I was a 'cloud puncher' (L.A.D)
    Author of... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack: Andersonstown.. Voices From 9 Battery Royal Artillery In Northern Ireland'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.... 'A Salford Pal: Pte Thomas Jay.'

  9. #19

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    Ah, and I suppose 40mm is large enough for anybody! I enjoyed time a the glorious Manorbier being ATO for the range there!

  10. #20

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    Manorbier was for the riff raff... Being the premier regiment in LAD, we used to do our shoots at Todendorf, Den Helder, and ground shoots - yes with a 40/70 - at Mourmelon le Grande. Also at Benbecula with Rapier.

    Cheers,
    Steve
    Author of... 'Belfast Diaries: A Gunner In Northern Ireland'... 'A Tough Nut To Crack: Andersonstown.. Voices From 9 Battery Royal Artillery In Northern Ireland'... 'An Accrington Pal: The Diaries of Pte Jack Smallshaw, September 1914 To March 1919'.... 'A Salford Pal: Pte Thomas Jay.'

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