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WWII U.S. Dog Tags

Article about: Hi guys, it's been a while. These have been my niche for several years now. Hope you enjoy! Ennis Ray Hite was born on April 3rd, 1920, in Bedford County, Virginia. He completed one year of

  1. #21

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    Leslie Bartlett was born on September 5th, 1906, in Dane, Wisconsin. He grew up there, and was married on August 9th, 1931. He lived in Janesville by at least 1939.

    Leslie was a career soldier, enlisting in the U.S. Army infantry on February 20th, 1936. By November 4th, 1938, he had been promoted to sergeant. On November 5th, he was commissioned as a 2nd lieutenant in the Wisconsin National Guard. By 1939, he was an officer of Wisconsin’s 32nd Tank Company. This unit soon after became Company A, 192nd Tank Battalion. This unit was deployed to the Philippines in September 1941.

    The 192nd Tank Battalion was one of the first American units to see combat during the war, and was the first to engage the enemy with tanks. From December 1941 until surrender at Bataan in April 1942, the 192nd was locked in futile combat against the invading Japanese forces in the Philippines. Those who surrendered participated in the Bataan Death March, and were subjected to inhumane treatment as prisoners of war. Of the 99 officers and men of Company A, 192nd Tank Battalion who went to the Philippines in 1941, only 35 returned alive. A memorial to the "Janesville 99" stands today in a Janesville park.

    Leslie was very lucky. Shortly before he was supposed to go overseas, Leslie was transferred out of the 192nd Tank Battalion for unknown reasons. He spent the war in the United States giving first aid classes and working in administration. He died on March 22nd, 1971, and is buried at Simi Valley Public Cemetery in Simi Valley, California.


    Photos:
    -The survivors of Company A, 192nd Tank Battalion in Janesville's "Tank Park", late 1940s
    -The memorial to Company A, 192nd Tank Battalion in Janesville
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    WWII U.S. Dog Tags  

  2. #22

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    WWII U.S. Dog Tags

    WWII U.S. Dog Tags

    One that I have been frustrated by for years, found in the Ardennes. Can only hope that Redmond got home.

  3. #23

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    Raymond Dopp was born in Burlington, Vermont, on December 29th, 1914. He attended Burlington High School, and graduated from the University of Vermont in 1937. He was a member of Sigma Nu fraternity and the Freemasons. He was a high school principal before enlisting in the U.S. Army Reserve in 1941.

    In October 1941, Raymond was called to active duty, and sent to Fort Benning, Georgia. He trained as a paratrooper, and was eventually assigned to the 13th Airborne Division headquarters, where he served as the division assistant chief of staff G-1 (personnel) officer. By October 1944, he was in the G-3 (operations) section working as the I&E officer. The 13th Airborne Division was sent to Europe in February 1945, but never saw combat. It is one of the only U.S. Army divisions that shared this fate during the war. Multiple operations were planned, but never executed, since the ground forces had been advancing at such a rapid pace that most airborne operations had become unnecessary. While stationed in France, Raymond set up a complete educational system for three villages, which was later featured in the New York Times. He came home in August 1945, and was discharged in 1946 as a major.

    After the war, Raymond earned his Ph.D. in education from Boston University and served as federal liaison for the Department of Education for the state of Connecticut. He retired in 1981. He died on January 24th, 1997, and is buried at Lakeview Cemetery in Burlington, Vermont.


    Photo: Paratroopers of the 13th Airborne Division after a cancelled jump
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    WWII U.S. Dog Tags  

  4. #24

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    Chester Reber was born on January 7th, 1914, in Chehalis, Washington. He lived at 783 Rhode Island Avenue. He graduated high school and worked as a truck driver at Willamette Hauling Company before the war. He was 6’1.5” tall, 170 pounds, had brown eyes, brown hair, and a dark complexion.

    Chester was drafted and entered service on March 24th, 1941, in Tacoma, Washington. He was assigned serial number 39377485. He served as an instructor at Camp Roberts until at least early 1942, then trained as a paratrooper, earning his wings on April 29th, 1944. He went overseas with HQ Battery, 680th Glider Field Artillery Battalion, 17th Airborne Division, in August, 1944. By December, he was at the front in France. His unit first saw combat during the Battle of the Bulge in Sibret, Belgium, and later participated in Operation Varsity, where it suffered heavy casualties. After the end of hostilities in May 1945, Chester participated in the occupation of Germany. He was honorably discharged as a sergeant.

    After the war, Chester became an insurance agent, running his own agency in Washington until he died on November 28th, 1966. He is buried at Cowlitz View Memorial Gardens in Kelso, Washington.


    Photo: Men of HQ/680 in Wesel during Operation Varsity, March 1945
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  5. #25

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    Another nice tag and story Obkrieger. Of interest in the photo from Wesel is that a couple of the paras wear the yellow neck scarfs as issued to aid identification issued for the Varsity operation.
    Last edited by BlackCat1982; 04-17-2021 at 09:15 PM. Reason: Typo

  6. #26

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    Nolan Booth was born in Cainsville, Missouri, on September 18th, 1912. He was 5’8”, weighed 145 pounds, had blue eyes, brown hair, and a ruddy complexion. He was a truck driver before the war.

    Nolan entered the U.S. Army Reserve on January 12th, 1941, and was given serial number 37001001. He was activated on February 20th, 1942, at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri, and assigned to Anti-Tank Company, 164th Infantry Regiment, "Americal" Division. His role was anti-tank gun crewman. The regiment landed at Guadalcanal in October 1942, where it became the first U.S. Army unit to take offensive action during the war. For unknown reasons, Noland was transferred out of the 164th after the Battle of Guadalcanal, and back to the U.S. in May 1944. In January 1945, he was sent through the infantry replacement system to Europe, where he joined Company E, 411th Infantry Regiment, 103rd Infantry Division. From then until the end of the war, Noland fought through the Siegfried Line and into Germany, participating in the liberation of Dachau concentration camp, and linking up with the 88th Infantry Division in Austria. He was honorably discharged as a private first class On September 24th, 1945. He was one of the very few infantrymen who participated in campaigns in both the Pacific and ETO.

    Noland moved to Rifle, Colorado, in 1945, and worked for the city and surrounding oilfields. He was charged with some pretty terrible crimes in 1966, and died that year on September 16th. He is buried at Rose Hill Cemetery in Rifle, Colorado.


    Photos:
    -Color Guard of the 164th Infantry Regiment on Guadalcanal, 1943
    -Men of the 411th Infantry Regiment in Alsace, March 1945
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  7. #27

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    A.J. Bivens was born in Waurika, Oklahoma, on January 22nd, 1924. He had grey eyes, brown hair, stood 5’10”, weighed 165 pounds, and had a light complexion. He lived in Portales, New Mexico, and worked at a school. He was married on April 24th, 1943.

    A.J. was drafted and entered service on July 16th, 1944, at Fort Bliss, Texas. He took basic training and ended up as a replacement in Company I, 34th Infantry Regiment, 24th Infantry Division. He was eventually made a platoon sergeant, and carried a Browning Automatic Rifle. In February 1945, his unit landed among the assault wave on Corregidor. On February 20th, he was ambushed by several Japanese soldiers armed with grenades, wounding himself and many others in his squad. He covered the withdrawal of his squad with his BAR, one by one, until he could crawl back to his unit with shrapnel in his leg. For this action, he was awarded the Purple Heart and Silver Star Medal. Around 70 dead Japanese soldiers were found in the area when it was later retaken. He was hospitalized for his wound and malaria, returned in April 1945, and continued to fight alongside the 34th Infantry Regiment in the Philippines. He came home in March 1946, and was discharged on April 7th at Fort Bliss.

    After the war, A.J. became an award-winning high school science teacher. He died on March 15th, 1993, and is buried at Mitchell Cemetery in Cisco, Texas.


    Photo: A.J. in the Philippines, 1945
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