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Early M1910 kochgeschirr

Article about: Good day all, A humble piece of kit, perhaps, but I would like to show my newly acquired, pre-/early-war M1910 Kochgeschirr/Essgeschirr. Made from black-painted aluminium, the M1910 is readi

  1. #1
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    Default Early M1910 kochgeschirr

    Good day all,
    A humble piece of kit, perhaps, but I would like to show my newly acquired, pre-/early-war M1910 Kochgeschirr/Essgeschirr.
    Made from black-painted aluminium, the M1910 is readily identified by the large reinforcing rib, riveted to the length of the lid handle. A small cutout is provided near the base of this rib, to allow for one of the two fastening straps required to secure it to the Tornister flap. Below this cutout is an arched ‘loop’, for use with the (now extremely hard to find) aluminium extension handle. There is a neatly machined little shelf and edge rebate in the opening of the pot, to accommodate the folding, combination spoon/fork or ‘spork’. - These two accessories are now on my wish list!

    The set retains a good 75-80% of its original paint and is very clean inside and out. Both components are clearly marked by the manufacturer, ‘A. Lamprecht, Penig i./Sa.’ (for Adolf Lamprecht, Stanz- und Emaillierwerke, Penig, Sachsen). The name ‘Mayrer’ has been scratched onto the lid.

    This set was listed as having a 1918 date stamp on the lid, and a 1914 date to the pot. This seemed somewhat baffling, since production of the M1910 was stopped in 1915, in order to save precious aluminium, and replaced by the enamelled steel version, M1915. So, why should this example have a 1918 date?

    At first glance, the lid does appear to be dated 1918, but closer inspection of the (seemingly oversized) ‘8’ reveals the answer.
    The neatly aligned ‘1’ was part of the original maker’s name stamp - to be used in conjunction with a set of individual, completing numerals (from 0-9) - thus allowing for ten years of use from that stamp, from 1910 to 1919.
    A separate ‘2.’ was initially stamped (a little too high), into the lid, presumably in 1912, but has then been over-stamped with a better placed ‘3.’, to indicate the following year. The whole mash has resulted in something that can easily be misread as an ‘8’.

    I wonder if the lid was set aside for later re-working, having failed the then peacetime quality controls.. only to be thrown back into the assembly line when things got a little more ‘intense’!

    Oh.. and I’m going to need an M1915 set now, too.
    For comparison, of course..
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Early M1910 kochgeschirr   Early M1910 kochgeschirr  

    Early M1910 kochgeschirr   Early M1910 kochgeschirr  

    Early M1910 kochgeschirr   Early M1910 kochgeschirr  


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  3. #2

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    Congratulations on a acquiring this really nice early early example Kohima. I remember reading that black enamelled variety were produced in the second half of the Great War, but I wasn’t aware of them being painted black so early on. A well written post with some interesting information.

    Andy

  4. #3
    MAP
    MAP is offline
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    Very nice example! Nicely marked too!
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  5. #4
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    Many thanks for your kind words, gentlemen.
    Interestingly, a very similar model was produced for the Reichswehr, often unmarked, but differing in some details that visually separate it from the M1910 (the M1915 being a purely wartime expedient).
    This post-war version of the M1910, either enamelled or painted black, can have the same reinforcement rib to the handle, or a simple bar (or even, flat) loop fixed to the end of the handle, for the equipment strap.
    The biggest giveaway for identifying a Reichswehr model is that it (generally) has a folded, protruding lip to the top of the handle mounting bracket* - a feature adopted in 1917 - to prevent the equipment strap from slipping off the top when secured to a Tornister or assault pack assembly, and a standard detail on mess kits thereafter.

    Theoretically, all mess kits were to be enamelled grey or field-grey for the remainder of the war, though I am sure other colours would be used where enamel stocks were limited (fairly sure I’ve seen a dark blue one before), so it is very possible that black enamelled, undated examples could be wartime.

    I wish my kochgeschirr collection was more complete, to be able to illustrate its evolution.
    Funny how this stuff gets under your skin, isn’t it?
    Last edited by Kohima; 05-22-2022 at 11:59 PM.

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