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Bluse model 1915

Article about: Opinions more than welcome on this or any addition info always appreciated Broken button was in pocket Model 1915 bluse dated 1917 Reserve Infantry Regiment 261 ARMEEKORPS BA III. There is a

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    Default Bluse model 1915

    Opinions more than welcome on this or any addition info always appreciated
    Broken button was in pocket

    Model 1915 bluse dated 1917 Reserve Infantry Regiment 261 ARMEEKORPS BA III. There is a G over the III not sure why or what that representsBluse model 1915Bluse model 1915Bluse model 1915Bluse model 1915Bluse model 1915Bluse model 1915Bluse model 1915Bluse model 1915Bluse model 1915Bluse model 1915[ATTACH]undefined[/ATTACH]
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    Bluse model 1915   Bluse model 1915  

    Bluse model 1915  

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    Bump this to the top again.

  3. #3
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    The III over G, or vice versa, is unusual - BAG denoting Bekleidungsampt der Garde korps - and may suggest that the garment was ‘transferred’ from one Corps Depot to another, prior to its issue. This was an occasional occurrence, but here are, however, many issues I see with these markings and, indeed, the garment itself.

    The position of the stamps are off-regulation. Bavarian regiments routinely (and typically, just to be different), positioned their depot and unit markings directly below the centre of the collar - here off to one side - while Prussian and all other states marked theirs to the upper left front (below the size codes, which in all cases would be at the very top, not at the waist, as here).
    However, if we take the stamp positions to suggest Bavarian use, Regiment 261 was not a Bavarian unit, which never reached such numbers.

    Regiment 261 was neither assigned to the guard or, as far as I can tell, III. corps (I believe it came under IV. Corps), though this in itself is not an impossibility either, as depots were latterly providing uniform and equipment for others suffering supply shortages.

    Aside from all of this, I cannot say that I like the font style at all, which looks more like a stamping kit from the latter half of the last century, than a period style.

    The collar facing cloth is odd and unlike the regulation badge cloth of the Prussian and other armies. Here it is of course weave and appears quite a dark grey-brown, rather than the smooth and fairly insipid green of regulation.
    Again, if we take this to purport to be a Bavarian garment, the collar of their Feldbluse (actually a Model 1916, as they eventually adopted the design months after the rest of the army), was of the same cloth as the rest of the tunic.

    The shape of the skirt pocket flaps is non-standard, appearing quite square, rather than having a deeply curved leading edge. The blotchy colour and yellow staining (reminiscent of bleach staining), of the lining is peculiar, too. The overall cut does not appear generous enough for this style of bluse.

    All in all, there are far too many oddities about this item, and it puts me in mind of a very well converted Swedish greatcoat. I, of course, do not have it in hand and the photographs may not do it justice, but it is certainly not one that I would be happy to have in my collection. I would advise you to walk away from this example.

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