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The Kaiser's men’s medals

Article about: The Kaiser's men’s medals (and Homelands) Some time ago acquiring this postcard for my collection. It’s a small piece of art on paper that someone used on April 21, 1916 It’s an incred

  1. #381

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    Given the immensity of von Manstein's historical figure... let him briefly tell us his story....

    Maybe he would tell us something like that...

    I was born in 1887 and baptized Fritz Erich von Lewinski. I was adopted by my uncle Georg who, like my father, was a general.
    I served the Kaiser in the great war. I stayed in the army in the interwar period. I returned to serve my country in World War II. I had a talent for planning. It worked well in Poland in 1939 and better in France in 1940.A new word came up to define my idea: it was called blitzkrieg.

    Then I was sent to Russia. There I lost my beloved son Gero on October 29, 1942. He was only nineteen…

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Another generation, another time father and son.... The proud father poses with the young Lieutenant Gero (Erich Sylvester) von Manstein

    Conquered Crimea in 1941, captured Sevastopol in 1942.
    After the disaster of Stalingrad, in March 1943, I led the most successful German offensive of the entire war: I reconquered Kharkov and Belgorod. I stopped the Soviet offensive and caused them catastrophic losses. A new word came up to define my idea: it was called elastic defense. It was a success. After the battle of Kursk, in September 1943, I managed to retreat to the western side of the Dnieper. I saved my army again and again inflicted huge casualties on the Soviets.

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    I adore this photo. Smoking the cigar of victory...

    In mid-February 1944 I disobeyed Hitler and broke through the encirclement of Cherkassy by pulling 56,000 of my men out of the trap. That was the straw that broke the camel's back. On 30 March 1944 I was withdrawn from the front, forced to resign and sent near Dresden to convalesce from my eye disease, went into retirement and awaited the end of the war.

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    This other one is great and not very common to see: Der Generalfeldmarschall und der Weihnachtsmann

    I was captured by the British. I was tried by a British court in Nuremberg in 1946. I was sentenced to 18 years in prison. In 1953, after my release, I was an adviser to the federal government for the creation of the Bundeswehr and helped my former enemies protect Western Europe from the Soviet threat. I dedicated my entire life and skill to serving my country.

    I died in Irschenhausen, Bavaria on June 11, 1973. There I rest with my Jutta and our beloved Gero....

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Grave of the von Manstein family

  2. #382

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    Moritz (Karl Albert) von Bock (1828 – 1897) was a Prussian General

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Moritz von Bock, 1828-1897

    After his father's death, Bock ingresed the cadet houses in Potsdam and Berlin. He was then transferred to the 29th Infantry Regiment of the Prussian Army as a second lieutenant on 1844.

    In 1849 he took part in the battles during the suppression of the Baden Revolution. In 1856, Bock was promoted to adjutant of the Fusilier Battalion and in this capacity was promoted to first lieutenant in 1857. Bock became a captain in 1859. When the army expanded at the beginning of July 1860, Bock was appointed company commander and he was transferred to the 3rd Westphalian Infantry Regiment, with which he took part in the battles of Münchengrätz and Königgrätz in the war against Austria in 1866. He received a commendation for his brave behavior on September 20, 1866.

    Promoted to major, Bock was transferred to the 7th East Prussian Infantry Regiment No. 44 in mid-February 1869. During the war against France, he was given command of the 2nd Battalion on July 27, 1870, was wounded in the Battle of Colombey by a rifle shot in the left foot and took part in the siege of Metz.

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Battle of St Quentin 19 January 1871

    From November 27, 1870, Bock was leader of his regiment. He led this unit at Amiens and at the Hallue as well as before Péronne. At Saint-Quentin he was wounded by a shot in the left arm and then gave up command of the regiment. Awarded both classes of the Iron Cross, he was briefly leader of the 7th East Prussian Infantry Regiment No. 44 after the peace treaty in August 1871.

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    The Prussians on the Grand'Place in 1871 St. Quentin

    In recognition of his services, Emperor Wilhelm, I raised him to the hereditary Prussian nobility on January 19, 1873. By the end of March 1876, Bock was promoted to colonel and was transferred to Küstrin on May 18, 1876 as commander of the 5th Brandenburg Infantry Regiment.

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    The two participation clasps of the 1870/1 campaign medal that corresponded to Major Moritz von Bock

    As a result of his injuries sustained during the war against France, Bock developed a nervous disorder that paralyzed his limbs. He was no longer fit for field use. Therefore, on December 15, 1881, he was appointed commander of Torgau with a position à la suite in his regiment. He received the rank of major general on September 13, 1882 and was retired from service on May 10, 1884, being awarded the Order of the Red Eagle, 2nd class, with oak leaves and a pension.

    On the 25th anniversary of the Battle of Saint-Quentin, Emperor Wilhelm II honored him by awarding him the Star of the Order of the Crown, Second Class. He died on April 16, 1897 in Charlottenburg and was buried three days later in the Invalidenfriedhof

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Fedor von Bock, 1880-1945

    His son was generalfeldmarshal Fedor von Bock: Poland, Belgium, France, Barbarossa….

    The Kaiser's men’s medals

  3. #383

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    Bernhard (Eduard Adolf) von Brauchitsch (1833 - 1910) was a Prussain general.

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Bernhard von Brauchitsch, 1833 - 1910

    Bernhard came from the Silesian noble family von Brauchitsch. After his school studies, Bernhard began studying law and photography at the universities of Bonn, Heidelberg, Halle and Berlin. After successfully completing his studies, he worked as a judicial trainee from 1855.

    In 1859 he entered military service. As a young officer, von Brauchitsch took part in the Austro-Prussian War of 1866 (Deutscher Krieg) and the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-71 Where he won both categories of the iron cross.

    After winning the war against France, he worked from 1871 as a staff officer in the General Government of Lorraine. After briefly overseeing the Inspectorate of Military Schools in 1889, General von Brauchitsch was assigned as director of the Kriegsakademie in Berlin from 20 September 1890 to 19 April 1896 and also served as General à la suite in Kaiser Wilhelm II.'s retinue.
    Upon his retirement from active duty on 18 April 1896, Lieutnant-General- von Brauchitsch was promoted to the brevet rank of General der Cavallerie.

    Two of his sons, Adolf and Gottfried, served at the rank of Generalmajor in the Prussian Army.

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    General Oberst Walther von Brauchitsch, 1881 - 1948

    His sixth son Generalfeldmarschall Walther von Brauchitsch was commander-in-chief of the German Wehrmacht at the outset of World War Two.
    The army's failure to take Moscow earned Hitler's enmity, and things worsened for him, as he suffered a heart attack in November.
    In the aftermath of the failure at Moscow, Brauchitsch was dismissed as Commander-in-Chief of the German Army on 19 December and was transferred to the Führerreserve (officers reserve), where he remained without assignment until the end of the war; he never saw Hitler again.

    Bernhard von Brauchitsch grave is located in the Invalidenfriedhof in Berlin.

    The Kaiser's men’s medals

  4. #384
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    I enjoy very much how you manage to link geography, history, medals, decorations & specially the people behind all that. Keep on this great work Santi.
    Jack

  5. #385

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    (Karl Rochus) Edwin von Manteuffel (1809 - 1885) was a Prussian General der Kavallerie

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Edwin Freiherr von Manteuffel, 1809-1885

    General Hasso von Manteuffel's father was Eccard von Manteuffel, an army officer, who died in January 1907. (biography by Donald Gray Brownlow "Panzer Baron: The Military Exploits of General Hasso von Manteuffel" - The Christopher Publishing House, North Quincy, Massachusetts, 1975).

    This book mentions two of the general's ancestors:

    - Otto von Manteuffel, Prime Minister of Prussia from 1850 to 1858, and

    - General der Kavallerie (Karl Rochus) Edwin von Manteuffel.

    This officer received the Prussian Order Pour le Mérite on August 7, 1866 while serving as Adjutant General and Commander-in-Chief of the Army of the Main during the Austro-Prussian War of 1866. He later received the Oak Leaves of this order on August 24. December 1870 while serving as Adjutant General and Commander-in-Chief of the I Prussian Army Corps during the Franco-Prussian War of 1870-1871.

    During this war, he moved from command of the I Army Corps to command of the First Army and finally to command of the Southern Army. After the war, he commanded the German occupation troops in France.

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    General der Panzertruppe Hasso von Manteuffel, 1897-1978

    As we all Freiherr Hasso (Eccard) von Manteuffel descendant from the Prussian noble von Manteuffel family was a general during World War II who commanded the 5th Panzer Army. He was a recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross with Oak Leaves, Swords and Diamonds.

    He took a notable participation in Operation Barbarossa, Battle of Tunisia, Battle of the Dnieper, Battle of the Bulge, Battle of the Seelow Heights and Battle of Berlin.....

    I have chosen these three images from his career...

    The Kaiser's men’s medals

    The Kaiser's men’s medals

    The Kaiser's men’s medals

    Von Manteuffel was a small man, but he was a giant in command of panzer troops....

    The Kaiser's men’s medals

  6. #386

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    At least one v.Manteuffel emigrated to the US, dropping the "Von"...I met a US Army Captain Manteuffel back in the late 1980s and we chatted about his family's history...

  7. #387

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    Very interesting, as usual. My favourite Panzer leaders are von Manteuffel and Graf Strachwitz. BTW many years ago I was on a motorcycle ride and saw a car in a parking lot with the licence plate 'Rommel'. I asked the driver about it, and it turned out he was a nephew of the field marshal.

  8. #388

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    Hermann (Friedrich Karl) von Stülpnagel (Potsdam, January 6, 1839 - Darmstadt, March 1, 1912) was a Prussian lieutenant general.

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Hermann von Stülpnagel, 1839-1912

    He entered Potsdam as a cadet in 1851 and from there to Berlin in 1854. In 1857 he was transferred to the 1st Guards Infantry Regiment of the Prussian Army as a second lieutenant. There he was promoted to first lieutenant in June 1865.

    In this position, Stülpnagel took part that same year in the battles near Soor, Königinhof and Königgrätz during the war against Austria. In September 1866 he was promoted to supernumerary captain of the Guard. In 1868 he was appointed company commander in the 1st Infantry Guards Regiment.

    In the war against France, Stülpnagel fought at St. Privat, the siege of Paris and at Le Bourget on August 30 and December 21, 1870. He obtained the Iron Cross 2nd class.

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    The 2nd Battle of Bourget, December 21, 1870. Bivouac of the badly defeated French troops

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Medal of the 1870/71 Campaign with clasps Gravelotte - St. Privat and Paris

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Iron Cross 2nd Class, 1870

    On June 16, 1871 he was assigned as wing adjutant to Kaiser Wilhelm I. While he remained in this position, he was transferred to the Prussian embassy in Munich as a military attaché. He continued his military career until obtaining the rank of lieutenant general in 1890.

    He died on March 1, 1912 in Darmstadt. He was the father of Carl-Heinrich (Rudolf Wilhelm) von Stülpnagel (2 January 1886 – 30 August 1944)

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Carl Heinrich von Stülpnagel, 1886 - 1944

    From 20 December 1940 to 4 October 1941, Stülpnagel as a General der Infanterie commanded the 17th Army. On 22 June 1941, after the launch of Operation Barbarossa, he successfully led this army across southern Russia. Under Stülpnagel's command, the 17th Army achieved victory during the Battle of Uman and the Battle of Kiev.

    In February 1942, Stülpnagel was made German-occupied France's military commander (in succession to his cousin, Gen. Otto von Stülpnagel)
    He was a member of the 20 July Plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler, being in charge of the conspirators' actions in France. On the day in question, 20 July 1944, Stülpnagel put his part of the plot into operation.

    This mainly involved to round up all SS and Gestapo officers in Paris and imprison them. However, when it became apparent that the assassination attempt in East Prussia had failed, Stülpnagel was forced to release his prisoners.

    After the failure of the plot, he was recalled to Berlin, he stopped at Verdun and attempted to commit suicide by shooting himself in the head with a pistol on the banks of the Meuse River, but failed……. Tried on 30 August 1944, he was convicted of treason and executed on the same day.

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    An incredible photo....Paris, spring 1944.From left to right: Lutheran Pastor Rudolf Damrath (1905-1959), head army chaplain for all occupying troops in France, Generalfeldmarschall Erwin Rommel (1891-1944), General der Infanterie Carl Heinrich von Stülpnagel (1886-1944) and Generalleutnant Hans Speidel (1897-1984)

    I can almost smell the conspiracy in that room....

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Last edited by TabsTabs1964; 04-23-2024 at 10:58 PM.

  9. #389

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    Gerd (Arnold Konrad) von Rundstedt
    (Berlin, February 19, 1848 - Heikendorf, January 4, 1916) Prussian major-general.

    Unfortunately I haven't found any images of him.

    Gerd von Rundstedt joined the Hussar Regiment No. 10 of the Prussian Army in 1865 as an ensign and was promoted to second lieutenant on July 20, 1866. In the same year he took part in the German war. In 1869 Rundstedt was promoted to regimental adjutant and in this position took part in the war against France in 1870/71. For his achievements he received the Iron Cross, Second Class.

    He was the father of four children, all of them became Prussian Army officers. Next we will talk about the elder of them.

    Gerd von Rundstedt was born in Aschersleben, north of Halle in Prussian Saxony (now in Saxony-Anhalt). As we said he was the eldest son of Gerd Arnold Konrad von Rundstedt, a cavalry officer who served in the Franco-Prussian War. The Rundstedts are an old Junker family that traced its origins to the 12th century and classed as members of the Uradel, or old nobility, although they held no titles. Virtually all the Rundstedt men since the time of Frederick the Great had served in the Prussian Army.

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    (Karl Rudolf) Gerd von Rundstedt (Aschersleben, December 12, 1875 - Hannover, February 24, 1953)

    Invasion of Poland, Battle of France, Battle of Kiev, Battle of Dieppe, Battle of Kursk, Battle of Hürtgen Forest, Operation Market-Garden, Battle of the Bulge.... Reached the rank of field marshal (Generalfeldmarschall) in the Wehrmacht

    He was recalled at the beginning of World War II as commander of Army Group South in the invasion of Poland. He commanded Army Group A during the Battle of France, and was promoted to the rank of Field Marshal in 1940. In the invasion of the Soviet Union, he commanded Army Group South, responsible for the largest encirclement in history, the Battle of Kiev. He was relieved of command in December 1941, but was recalled in 1942 and appointed Commander-in-Chief in the West.

    He was dismissed after the German defeat in Normandy in July 1944, but was again recalled as Commander-in-Chief in the West in September, holding this post until his final dismissal by Adolf Hitler in March 1945...

    The Kaiser's men’s medals

    I would say that the fourth ribbon in his ribbon bar is the China Denkmünze.
    Last edited by TabsTabs1964; 04-25-2024 at 11:18 PM.

  10. #390

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    I have chosen a few illustrative images of his career.

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Berlin 1934. Von Rundstedt, Werner von Fritsch and Werner von Blomberg, attend a memorial service. Unter den Linden, Berlín.

    You all probably know this Getty image.....

    The Kaiser's men’s medals

    Summer 1941. Field airfield of Army Group South near Berdichev (Ukraine). Hitler welcomed by Field Marshal Gerd von Rundstedt; behind Hitler, Colonel Rudolf Schmundt, Hitler’s Wehrmachtsadjutant

    But this other may be the first time you see...

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Next to the wing of the Ju52. The same two Luftwaffe soldiers (one tall and one short). The SS-Brigadefuhrer who in the Getty image descends from the plane, in the second photo is to the right of the image. In the second image, behind Hitler, there is also an SS-Hauptsturmfuhrer

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Summer 1941. Army Group South.. From left to right: General der Infanterie Georg von Sodenstern (Chief of the General Staff Army Group South), Colonel in the General Staff Julius von Bernuth (Liaison Officer of the Army High Command to Army Group South), Generalfeldmarschall Gerd von Rundstedt (Commander-in-Chief Army Group South) and Lieutenant Colonel in the General Staff August Winter (Ia First General Staff Officer Army Group South).

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    París 1941 von Runsted greeting Generalfeldmarschall Erwin von Witzleben (Oberbefehlshaber Heeresgruppe D) On the 40th anniversary of his service

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Paris July 1943 Welcoming Turkish general Toydemir and the Turkish Miitar mission

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    France, spring 1944. Atlantic Wall Inspection

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Ulm, Germany. October 1944. Rommel-funeral speech

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    Rundstedt with U.S. Major-General Frank W. Milburn, Commanding General of U.S. XXI Corps, 2 May 1945

    The Kaiser's men’s medals
    With Maj. Gen. John Dahlquist, commander of the 36th Infantry Division... Now that's a look. I wonder what they were both thinking at that moment.

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