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hinomaru translation request

Article about: Hello everyone. Before buying i would like to know if this one is good an what is written on please? As always any help and time is very appreciated! Regards Delibes.

  1. #1

    Default hinomaru translation request

    Hello everyone.

    Before buying i would like to know if this one is good an what is written on please?
    As always any help and time is very appreciated!

    Regards Delibes.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture hinomaru translation request  

  2. #2

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    I thought you knew better than to show the wrong side. A Kigou Signed by Army Lt. General Shioden.

    This is not called a Yosegaki, but 揮毫 (Kigou) or 献書 (Kensho), which is how most Yosegaki start out.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture hinomaru translation request  

  3. #3

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    Sorry nick for the picture my wife did the work for me i am stuck with the flu for a week now. And it goes not better.
    Anyway thank you for the translation and time it is very appreciated.
    When i have the flag i will archive it with the translation as always thanks to you!

  4. #4
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    Thank you Nick for your detailed explanations! My passion is collecting Japanese militaria, especially signed flags. I am a student, always willing to learn. I am fascinated by your reply. I looked up (Kigou) and (Kensho), but being out of context it didn't make sense what I was reading. Can you please elaborate on that term, for my own knowledge. I truly appreciate your time and talent!!

    Thank you Nick!
    Paul G-

  5. #5

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    Kigou is the more official term in this context. When you ask a senior person, particularly someone known for his wisdom and calligraphy skills, that is a Kigou. The person will write his personal motto, wisdom from the Chinese classics, etc and present it to the junior person. In the West, it's like presenting the most inspiring words from the bible or a quote from Shakespeare.

    Kensho is more in the context of a junior person doing the same to a senior person.

    Yosegaki flags begin most of the time by asking a senior person, like a retired general in your neighborhood for a Kigou. If this person happens to be one that performs calligraphy as an art, when his writing is finished, he will often mark his work with a series of Rakkan stamps, which can be up to 4 stamps.
    I illustrated below, the positions and meaning of the 3 most commonly encountered stamps. When a calligrapher does this on a Kakejiku (long vertical role) he or she will always use Rakkan, but writing on a flag is a more casual act, so it may be without these stamps, particularly when the artist knows the flag will further get signed by others as a Yosegaki.

    Putting the Rakkan stamps on basically is declaring the piece as a work of art, so the recipient will hesitate to mar this by allowing other mortals to add their signatures.

    Also when you begin with a Kigou from such a highly respected person, you cannot just take it to classmates to sign, so it has be taken to others in senior positions. Yosegaki flags thus also represent social structure, which is something to keep in mind when authenticating a flag.

    Of the 3 stamps, only the stamp with white letters on a red background is worth reading, as that is his/her real name and the rest is artist babble.

    Anyway, other than shrine stamps, this is why you can find so many stamps on a Yosegaki flag.
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture hinomaru translation request  

  6. #6
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    Thank you so much Nick! Very fascinating!

    Paul G

  7. #7

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    As an example, here is a Kigou from Isoroku Yamamoto and close ups of the stamps used.
    Attached Images Attached Images hinomaru translation request  hinomaru translation request  hinomaru translation request 

  8. #8

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    Very informative explanation that will certainly help me in the future when collecting flags. Thank you for always pointing us in the right direction when collecting.

  9. #9

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    #5 is another informative post from Nick!!

    Here's a hint, fellahs, as to whether you read a horizontal motto from right-to-left, or left-to-right: the inshuin is the starting point.

    引首印
    Inshuin
    hinomaru translation request


    -- Guy

  10. #10

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    It looks like Yamamoto's pen name was

    長陸
    Chōriku
    hinomaru translation request
    hinomaru translation request

    -- Guy

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