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WW2 Japanese sword identification

Article about: Ok, brief history of me and this sword. When I was a young teenager my neighbor gave me this sword. Never thought much about it except it was really cool. My neighbor was in the Marines duri

  1. #1

    Default WW2 Japanese sword identification

    Ok, brief history of me and this sword. When I was a young teenager my neighbor gave me this sword. Never thought much about it except it was really cool. My neighbor was in the Marines during World War Two, he served in the Pacific theater.
    Other than that, I know little to nothing about it. There appears to be a bullet strike at the top of the blade.
    30 or so years later, I decide to take another look at it.WW2 Japanese sword identification
    Unfortunately, the entire scabbard is deteriorating and the blade isn’t in great shape. I’ve looked and can’t find any stamping or marking. Hopefully someone here can indenting and see if it’s worth getting restored? Thanks for any help

    Hmm, only lets me upload one picture. I’ll try more

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    MAP
    MAP is offline
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    Do you have photos of the whole blade?

    I won't even pretend to provide information on this as it is out of my league. Let's wait for the sword experts to stop in.
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  4. #4

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    WW2 Japanese sword identification

    Yep, sorry. No idea why I didn’t do that the first time around

  5. #5
    MAP
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    Quote by patsfantn View Post
    WW2 Japanese sword identification

    Yep, sorry. No idea why I didn’t do that the first time around
    Sorry on my side too. Length of the blade would probably help as well. The Saya is certainly not military.
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  6. #6

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    Looks like 32.75 inches

  7. #7

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    Quote by patsfantn View Post
    Looks like 32.75 inches
    Please measure from sword point to the notch on the back of the blade.WW2 Japanese sword identification

    Cool bullet strike (?) you have there!


    -- Guy

  8. #8
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    Also for some more ID help.
    Some close up's of the tang (Nakago) in the vertical position(Sword tip point up)
    Both sides

    Possibly close up of the scabbard? Would love to see the pattern that is on it.

    Semper Fi
    Phil

  9. #9

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    I'm not a nihonto expert (nihonto are traditionally made, vs mass-produced WWII blades), to take what I say with a grain of salt, but this looks really old and might be worth a polish (I know it's got a bullet hole, but still...). The guy you would send it to would be able to tell you more about the blade, and advise on whether a polish is worth doing.

  10. #10

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    I'm like Bruce not an expert, but I have very much enjoyed my Japanese sword collection and as a young boy had a huge interest in swords and blacksmiths. And the Japanese smiths are the best by far in the world. So I've soaked up any and every bit of info I've been able to get my hands on and collected everyone I could afford to keep, and I still would consider myself a very novice collector, so please consider my view an opinion and not fact. Japanese swords are one of the most difficult fields to try nd tackle, and to be familiar with the blades enough to be able to identify what era they were made. It may take ten years before one has handled enough and researched enough to be able to date them without a signature on the tang. Your sword from what I can see looks to be an older traditionally made sword that has been shortened at some point in time either because of damage from a previous battle much earlier then WWII or it could have been shortened for the WWII military mounts. Your sword is not a run of the mill machine made WWII NCO blade, those were basically mass produced and made from car bumpers (not really car bumpers but low quality steel) yours is a more desirable quality made blade and even better brought back from a Marine. With knowing who brought it back it may be better to leave the sword the way it came home. Getting a sword restored is very expensive and the waiting list for a polisher who works in the traditional way is very hard to find. But you never know until you get it identified it's very hard to tell much with the pictures you have taken they need to be much closer up and we need to see the hammon (temper line on the edge) and the tang to tell much more. Try taking some like the examples I have taken of one of mine. I hope my 2 cents was helpful sorry I couldn't help more. WW2 Japanese sword identificationWW2 Japanese sword identificationWW2 Japanese sword identificationWW2 Japanese sword identificationWW2 Japanese sword identificationWW2 Japanese sword identification

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