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Luftwaffe forestry knife Waffen-Loesche Ch. A. W.

Article about: Sometimes your searching for something and you come by chance across a gem that has been on the wishlist for quite some years. Arriving just before Christmas its my pricvate present for unde

  1. #211

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    Assuming that's a 1939 date, I have the same thinking and would even push the date back further. My reasoning being that copper based alloys were used in making the knives that should have been exhausted for non-military production. Best Regards, Fred

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  3. #212

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    Chromolit was a process/brand name for stainless steel cutlery used by the Arthur Wingen company. If Ch.AW on the Waffen-Loesche knife is "Chromolit" then logic would tell us the blade must be stainless steel. Certainly from photos of W-L knives, some seem to be, but equally could be nickel plated. Has this question been resolved, are the blades stainless steel? If not stainless, then the Chromolit Arthur Wingen theory is dead. If they are stainless steel it would strengthen the Arthur Wingen connection in my view.

  4. #213
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    Quote by Anderson View Post
    Chromolit was a process/brand name for stainless steel cutlery used by the Arthur Wingen company. If Ch.AW on the Waffen-Loesche knife is "Chromolit" then logic would tell us the blade must be stainless steel. Certainly from photos of W-L knives, some seem to be, but equally could be nickel plated. Has this question been resolved, are the blades stainless steel? If not stainless, then the Chromolit Arthur Wingen theory is dead. If they are stainless steel it would strengthen the Arthur Wingen connection in my view.
    I can assure you these knives do not have stainless steel blades.
    They have high carbon steel blades, crossgrain is evident on the minty pieces.

    Ger

  5. #214

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    In his book I believe he said chrome plated - but I do not have any independent information either one way or the other. The answer may (or may not) still be in the late Anthony Carter's notes. Regarding the archives, families and others he spoke with and researched in his trips to Solingen, in our correspondence he told me of some of his ups and his downs in finding information. That said, I know for an absolute fact that not everything he was given is in the book that was finished by others. Which is NOT repeat NOT a criticism - as I very much appreciate the efforts that went into getting the second half completed and published. Best Regards, Fred

  6. #215
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    Quote by Frogprince View Post
    In his book I believe he said chrome plated - but I do not have any independent information either one way or the other. The answer may (or may not) still be in the late Anthony Carter's notes. Regarding the archives, families and others he spoke with and researched in his trips to Solingen, in our correspondence he told me of some of his ups and his downs in finding information. That said, I know for an absolute fact that not everything he was given is in the book that was finished by others. Which is NOT repeat NOT a criticism - as I very much appreciate the efforts that went into getting the second half completed and published. Best Regards, Fred
    Well Fred the blades have a high gloss polish, but crossgrain is very well visible, if you have a chrome plated blade in most cases there would be no grain visible.
    IMO these knives are made for being used in the field, a carbon blade would make more sense, rather then a plated one which are mostly used for the walking out - parade uniform.

    Regards
    Ger

  7. #216

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    Quote by gerrit View Post
    Well Fred the blades have a high gloss polish, but crossgrain is very well visible, if you have a chrome plated blade in most cases there would be no grain visible.
    IMO these knives are made for being used in the field, a carbon blade would make more sense, rather then a plated one which are mostly used for the walking out - parade uniform.

    Regards
    Ger
    Ger, What you said makes sense to me, and the plating does tend to cover up all but the most excessive grinding/polishing. Or pitting as even some of the (speaking of other items) postwar plating over pitted blades that have been "upgraded" with etchings etc. might have light pitting that is mostly concealed, but can still have some signs of it (which is helpful in determining fakes). That said, (and not to "muddy" the waters) for some of my long since past commercial projects the stainless steel that was used came with a smooth "brush/satin" factory finish that under certain conditions did corrode. It could usually be cleaned up, but you had to repolish all of it (not just spots or patches) as the end users were expecting a reasonable degree of perfection. Best Regards, Fred

  8. #217

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    With carbon steel I think can put to bed the Chromolit theory. That's not the "Ch". I agree with Ger these are better quality made robust knives, not parade dress type knives. They may simply be a hunting knife, borrowed for use by a group or organization for it's own purposes. Whether that had anything to do with forestry, the Luftwaffe or Herman Goring is still far from clear.

  9. #218

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    Quote by Anderson View Post
    With carbon steel I think can put to bed the Chromolit theory. That's not the "Ch". I agree with Ger these are better quality made robust knives, not parade dress type knives. They may simply be a hunting knife, borrowed for use by a group or organization for it's own purposes. Whether that had anything to do with forestry, the Luftwaffe or Herman Goring is still far from clear.
    Anderson, I’m afraid that I have to most respectfully both (mostly) agree and disagree with some of what was said. Anthony was going to make corrections and additions to his first book which is where Chromolit is mentioned with references. That did not happen. And most unfortunately they seem to be for the most part postwar U.S. sources - not TR period German sources. John Walter quotes some of the same information, with Fisher adding a small amount of more up to date information. The “window of opportunity” for period information may already have closed. Although that is not certain if some of the old German records/information that Anthony used in his research are still accessible. Best Regards, Fred

  10. #219

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    I agree old documents are probably the only likely way to confirm the origin and purpose. I am hopeful that one day someone will uncover a Waffen-Loesche sales catalogue or perhaps some previously unknown photo might emerge showing a group wearing the type. But my impression is early post war writers leapt on explanations without solid evidence to back up those perceptions. Then there were some shady characters who knowingly invented daggers. Perhaps Carter had some documents that will become public one day.

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