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British trip wire alarms

Article about: good morning, please see the attached photo of what I am told is a group of British Army trip wire alarms. But are they? They are similar to the inners from xmas crackers only more substanci

  1. #1

    Default British trip wire alarms

    good morning, please see the attached photo of what I am told is a group of British Army trip wire alarms. But are they?

    They are similar to the inners from xmas crackers only more substancial. They are 12cm in length and would appear to designed for use with several trip wires at the same time.

    Has anyone come across such items before?

    many thanks

    Dave
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture British trip wire alarms  

  2. #2

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    They used to use something similar when there was a paint ball outfit in the woods near me. A length of string that fed into a thin red cardboard tube, similar to what we call a 'Banger' over here, but known elsewhere as a 'Firecracker'. I picked some up as they were lying around everywhere. If I can find where I put them I'll post a pic.

    Regards, Ned.
    'I do not think we can hope for any better thing now.
    We shall stick it out to the end, but we are getting weaker of course, and the end cannot be far.
    It seems a pity, but I do not think I can write more. R. SCOTT.
    Last Entry - For God's sake look after our people.'

    In memory of Capt. Robert Falcon Scott, Edward Wilson, Henry Bowers, Lawrence Oates and Edgar Evans. South Pole Expedition, 30th March 1912.

  3. #3

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    yes thats a thought Ned. One is marked 'MF' but no other markings or dates. dave

  4. #4

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    Well, I recognise these as something used by the Army Cadets (not actually a military unit more a military sponsored youth organisation) in the early '70s. They were used as trip alarms on exercises but I couldn't say if they were actually military items or just something quite safe compared to flares provided for use by hooligan cadets! Haha, boy scouts with rifles!!!

    I suppose they might have been low cost training aids maybe even Home Guard stuff during the war but all I can say is I recognise them for what they are.

    I hope this helps.

    Regards

    Mark
    "War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things. A man who has nothing for which he is willing to fight, nothing he cares more about than his own personal safety, is a miserable creature with no chance of being free unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself."

  5. #5

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    thanks Mark, that's quite likely what they are - teenagers and military flares/thunderflashes don't really go together these days! regards, dave

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