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Trench Art Shell Identification

Article about: Picked this up at the Max show. It's nothing special. But price was right. Does anyone recognize the stampings and type of shell that it is? The Era? I think the flag is Belgium. But the &qu

  1. #1
    MAP
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    Default Trench Art Shell Identification

    Picked this up at the Max show. It's nothing special. But price was right.

    Does anyone recognize the stampings and type of shell that it is? The Era?

    I think the flag is Belgium. But the "yellow" color in hand has a neon green hue to it.

    The shell is brass but has been given a gold wash.

    Shell casing is 3.2 inches (~8.1 cm) thick and 13 5/8th inches (~34 cm) tall. The base measures 3 7/8 (8.7cm)

    Thanks in advance

    Trench Art Shell Identification

    Trench Art Shell Identification

    Trench Art Shell Identification
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  2. #2
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    The 75 dec is sorta the most obvious give away to what fired the casing…

    Canon de 75 modele 1897 - Wikipedia

    So ww1 french

    75 DEC means 75 mm de Campagne

    The 16 means 1916

    478L is a lot number

    LN - Parc d'artillerie de Place de Lyon who I guess was the charge maker

    The D before the lot number would be the maker mark of the overall case but I can’t find a source saying who that was


    With all trench art. Especially large cases. I normally suspect it was something made after ww1. Bit in convenient to keep on your person at this large a casing. Then again who knows!

  3. #3
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    Quote by Jb4046 View Post
    The 75 dec is sorta the most obvious give away to what fired the casing…

    Canon de 75 modele 1897 - Wikipedia

    So ww1 french

    75 DEC means 75 mm de Campagne

    The 16 means 1916

    478L is a lot number

    LN - Parc d'artillerie de Place de Lyon who I guess was the charge maker

    The D before the lot number would be the maker mark of the overall case but I can’t find a source saying who that was


    With all trench art. Especially large cases. I normally suspect it was something made after ww1
    Thanks John. Was hoping you would see this.

    Yes, under no illusions this was made in a trench while being shelled

    Interesting to have what I think is a Belgium flag on it. I have seen very little trench art for Belgium. But maybe that is just due to me being on the other side of the pond.

    Thanks again!

    M

    Edit: I do see that this gun was used by the AEF as well. Might explain how it got over to the US by a returning soldier. But still doesn't explain the Belgium flag. Not important though.
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  4. #4
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    Here is something extra til I can find the D maker mark

    The second D after the lot number is the metal supplier

    Societe Electro-Mecanique de Dives (D)

    I mean it probably is the Belgium flag. Makes it more unique than others

  5. #5

    Lightbulb

    And of course, the shell gave its name to a famous cocktail.....

    French 75 cocktail - recipes and history

    ...which makes a nice 'conversation piece'......

  6. #6
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    Quote by Martin Bull View Post
    And of course, the shell gave its name to a famous cocktail.....

    French 75 cocktail - recipes and history

    ...which makes a nice 'conversation piece'......
    Interesting.......originally consisted of gin, apple brandy, grenadine and lemon juice. Known at the time as a lethally potent drink that will "knock you flat"

    I'll stick with my Scotch and Bourbon
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  7. #7

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    The over stamping is rework markings for a re-used cart case, (common in WW1). 478L is the Propellant Lot number, QF separate cart cases are normally lotted on either the Propellant or the Primer.

    I have a couple of 75mm. Always love the Fusee a D.E. 22/)/47-/89Z
    on the shrapnel.

    Trench Art Shell Identification

    R

  8. #8

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    Quote by Jb4046 View Post

    With all trench art. Especially large cases. I normally suspect it was something made after ww1. Bit in convenient to keep on your person at this large a casing. Then again who knows!
    Never rule anything out John. My friend, the late Stan Dobson was a prolific scavenger of material on the Western front - he also used to do guided tours on there too. I have seen partially completed trench art shell cases which he has recovered from battlefields, so that is sufficient evidence to prove it was done whilst in the line. You have to take in to account that being in the firing line was for much of the time a period of boredom interspaced with the occasional outbreak of sheer terror and death, and the front line soldier had to find ways of amusing himself. There was a system of 'live and let live observed by both sides in the trenches where even watering holes were shared with the enemy. After all, if you deprived your enemy of water, they would deprive you. Artillery barrages were also conducted at set times so as not to interfere with meal breaks. This all sounds far-fetched, but is absolutely true. It was only during time of actual attack such as trench raids and full scale assaults that it was very much like hell on earth.

    Cheers,
    Steve

  9. #9

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    "Hurry up and wait" being a well known phrase.

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