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    An example of the W.K. & C. logo as used on a...

    An example of the W.K. & C. logo as used on a trench knife made during World War 1, or a few years before (with thanks to Martin C.)
    We can see the knight is in the refined form as seen in Oleg's...
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    Staying on Imperial era Navy daggers, here's one...

    Staying on Imperial era Navy daggers, here's one from Oleg's collection (see seperate thread) which he dates to the 1912/13 period. It's an interesting development in the W.K.& C. logo. The Knight's...
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    To add to Ger's example of a W.K & C trademark as...

    To add to Ger's example of a W.K & C trademark as show on a P1890 Imperial Navy cadet's dagger, here is another example of the Knight's head alone, but probably made in the 1890's as it's a long...
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    The full company name was used until 1930 when...

    The full company name was used until 1930 when the company rebranded itself as "WKC". So typically on Polizei seitengewehr made in the 1920's the full company name as shown above is seen on one side...
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    Interesting one Ger. And of course before 1883...

    Interesting one Ger. And of course before 1883 the Kirschbaum company marked their blades with the Knight's head as shown in your example. Just exactly when the double head logo began is a little...
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    WKC trademark evolution

    Weyersberg Kirschbaum & Cie was the amalgamation of two very old Solingen family companies in 1883. Both companies had had their own trademark. For Weyersburg it was King's head and for Kirschbaum it...
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