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M16 re-issued camo with pick axe damage

Article about: A size 66 M16 manufactured by Quist (F.W. Quist, Esslingen/Neckar only made size 66), this example has had three coats of paint during its WW1 service. Firstly, it left the works with a fact

  1. #1

    Default M16 re-issued camo with pick axe damage

    A size 66 M16 manufactured by Quist (F.W. Quist, Esslingen/Neckar only made size 66), this example has had three coats of paint during its WW1 service. Firstly, it left the works with a factory applied light feldgrau, before it was reissued with a darker hand brushed feldgrau, before a final July 1918 directive camo with the more often encountered standard colours of green, ochre yellow and brown being applied. Member helmet2id (Jim) has an example with a similar colour application, design and damage.

    From the inside it is apparent that the leather liner band was removed before being replaced with the new M17 steel band, as the hand applied darker feldgrau shows from beneath the liner band. This may have been done quite early in the rollout of M17 steel liner bands as it has been fitted with the earlier vegetable dyed leather pads, as opposed to the new white chrome tanned type, which is no uncommon to see as the brown leather pad stocks were used up. The faint size 66 re-issue stamp in the rear apron also hints at the helmet being re-issued during the war.

    Whether original to the helmet or not, the relatively short length of the chinstrap suggests it may be a re-purposed M91 Pickelhaube strap as it has been suggested that there were sometimes re-used on steel helmets, while it’s also known that Pickelhaubes were still being used up until the end of the war albeit in the rear lines.

    The dome shows evidence of what appears to be pick axe damage rendered at the end of the war to demilitarise the helmet. Aside from the two main holes, there are multiple smaller indentations which may be initial strikes that weren’t forceful enough to penetrate. And of course no pick axe damaged helmet post would be complete without the now almost obligatory image of a man striking an Imperial steel helmet with a pick axe.

    Andy
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    Last edited by AndyM35; 04-13-2024 at 11:20 PM. Reason: Additional photos added.

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  3. #2
    MAP
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    Fantastic helmet, photos and description Andy

    A beauty. Congrats
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  4. #3
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    Andy, Compared to other examples the owner seems to have been a bit more lazy regarding the creativity of the paint scheme but I do think it’s nonetheless a beautiful helmet! It looks way better from your pictures compared to the dealer ones and the inside of the helmet has a very nice patina. Having an original chinstrap (if original to the helmet or not) is always a plus.
    The pickaxe damage especially is a very cool feature and adds to the history and character of the helmet in my opinion. All in all it’s a unique and interesting piece of ww1 and immediate post ww1 history.
    I’m glad that you were able to get it and that it’s in good hands now!

    Anon

  5. #4
    MAP
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    Quote by Anon View Post
    Andy, Compared to other examples the owner seems to have been a bit more lazy regarding the creativity of the paint scheme but I do think it’s nonetheless a beautiful helmet! It looks way better from your pictures compared to the dealer ones and the inside of the helmet has a very nice patina. Having an original chinstrap (if original to the helmet or not) is always a plus.
    The pickaxe damage especially is a very cool feature and adds to the history and character of the helmet in my opinion. All in all it’s a unique and interesting piece of ww1 and immediate post ww1 history.
    I’m glad that you were able to get it and that it’s in good hands now!

    Anon
    Lazy is such a harsh word in this world of snowflakes we live in. The term is "artistically challenged"

    Jokes aside, I actually like the simple pattern.
    "Please", Thank You" and proper manners appreciated

    My greatest fear is that one day I will die and my wife will sell my guns for what I told her I paid for them

    "Don't tell me these are investments if you never intend to sell anything" (Quote: Wife)

  6. #5

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    Nice helmet, but maybe a direct hit from a Puckle gun?

    Cheers,
    Steve

  7. #6

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    What a fantastic acquisition Andy, wow, thank you for sharing
    Paul

  8. #7

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    Good job, Andy.
    Great helmet.

    Regards
    Santi

  9. #8

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    Quote by Anon View Post
    Andy, Compared to other examples the owner seems to have been a bit more lazy regarding the creativity of the paint scheme but I do think it’s nonetheless a beautiful helmet! It looks way better from your pictures compared to the dealer ones and the inside of the helmet has a very nice patina. Having an original chinstrap (if original to the helmet or not) is always a plus.
    The pickaxe damage especially is a very cool feature and adds to the history and character of the helmet in my opinion. All in all it’s a unique and interesting piece of ww1 and immediate post ww1 history.
    I’m glad that you were able to get it and that it’s in good hands now!

    Anon
    It’s interesting because the painter pretty much followed the wording of the directive “On the front side of the helmet, no more than four colored fields must be visible. Light and dark colors are to be placed next to each other. The colored segments are to be sharply separated from each other by a finger-wide black stripe”. So, they got the light and dark bit right, but yes, not quite as artistic as some camos. Sometimes these were individually painted but at other times by a painter within the unit, so there was a lot of variety. In fact, I don’t have one camo that is very similar to the others, so they most are pretty individual.

    Andy

  10. #9

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    GREAT PIECE Andy! Jim G.

  11. #10

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    A beautiful example. I would like to think that the mis-strikes on the top are the guy with the pick axe shedding tears before he finally takes the plunge with the strike that penetrated the dome. All part of its history and of course unique in its camouflage style. I just love it.

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