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Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!

Article about: I shared a few of my ww2 handguns before so I decided I should show some love to the rifles as well. So, here we go. They are all shooters. (I apologize, some of the pictures got turned side

  1. #1

    Default Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!

    I shared a few of my ww2 handguns before so I decided I should show some love to the rifles as well. So, here we go. They are all shooters. (I apologize, some of the pictures got turned sideways)

    First, There's a 1904 Tula M91 (2nd model) Finnish owned rifle. It has been fitted with a cold weather Finnish stock (you can see its 2 pieces, a common practice the Finns' used in cold weather fighting. The bolt and receiver match but not much else does, apparently this was common with Finnish owned rifles. My theory is its a Mosin purchase rather than a capture, as it lacks any markings (outside of the Finnish army SA stamp), though that's not a fool proof theory, but with a date of 1904, it could of been in an arsenal in Finland before, during or after WW1 or even brief civil war period post war. It could also be a battlefield pick up all the same, but I still love it. Shoots great, very smooth. It has been counterbored, which suggests a lot of work out for the old girl, most likely combat used. There is also Arshin markings on the site which have been crossed out, as that system of measurement became obsolete. It takes an older ring style bayonet, which I haven't been able to pick up yet. It has a canvas sling marked SA, though it maybe post war, not sure. The action is extremely smooth, though the straight bolt can be a little tricky at first. Definitely has the field look to it, Very accurate at 100 yards.

    Second, There is a Type 99 rifle produced by Kokura Arsenal in Tokyo, 21st series sometime around 1942ish (getting production dates on Japanese rifles isn't an exact science). The Japanese rifles are interesting for their extra components, such as the monopod and the AA sights. This is an all matching rifle except for the monopod which I believe is a reproduction, but I'm not 100 percent sure. The action is extremely odd compared to western rifles, as you have to actually use a decent amount of force to cycle the weapon, compared to an Enfield it is night and day. Once again, has that used field look to it, though it retains a good bit of the bluing. I am assuming this was some sort of bring back rifle earlier on in the war, as it still has a crisp Chrysanthemum, though just a guess. I was able to pick up the typical Japanese sword style bayonet made by Toyoda Loom works. It has an older sling (The issued slings were far wider, though it could be Chinese as well). Still a fun shooter, though I haven't been able to shoot it a whole lot, as ammo is somewhat difficult to find for a decent price.

    Lastly, There is a late 1944 big letter BNZ K98, most likely one of the last runs before the Kriegsmodell. I based that on the O block of the serial number, as the 1945 series in its limited run usually started in the P/Q block. It is a mostly matching rifle (receiver and bolt being the big ones). Unfortunately, I had to change the stock out, it came with a Yugo one that was a DOU Waffenamt stamped and in pretty poor condition, but I managed to find an original Mauserwerk (655 stamped) stock and fitted it on nicely. You can really see some of the short cuts starting to come out with these later rifles, the barrel bands are spot welded for example and the overall craftsmanship and stamping is a bit sloppy, except for the BNZ shield. It also has blank BYF parts on it, which apparently was common for the later run rifles from BNZ (Magazine floor plate and magazine are marked BYF but nothing else). I was able to get a ASW 42 bayonet to go along with it. It has a CEY43 original sling. It is probably one of the best shooting rifles I have had the pleasure to shoot, very accurate and smooth action.

    Now I just need a Carcano....
    Click to enlarge the picture Click to enlarge the picture Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!   Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!  

    Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!   Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!  

    Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!   Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!  

    Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!   Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!  

    Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!   Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!  

    Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!   Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!  

    Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!   Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!  

    Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!   Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!  

    Weapons of the Axis, a couple rifles to share!  

  2. #2

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    Thanks for sharing! You almost never see Arisakas with monopod, AA sights, and mum. Can you give more details about the Finn cold weather stock? Why was a two piece stock better for use in cold weather? Really nice Kar98K too!

  3. #3

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    Hey Richard. When I first bought the rifle, I thought maybe it was a field repair. Upon further inspection, it was a well done feat of woodworking. I asked around and looked up what I can, and to my knowledge, whatever wood the Russians primarily made Mosin stocks with would start to warp under certain extreme temperatures. I know it's kind of hard to believe that the Russians of all people would not have foreseen this, but then again they were used to fighting in eastern Europe rather than Kestenga or Murmansk near the arctic circle. Funny thing with Finnish mosin captures/purchases, very few are the same, in parts and stocks. Russian wood tended to be darker and the finnish wood tended to be lighter.

    Finnish stocks were made from arctic Burch which had a higher tolerance to cold weather, unfortunately I'm not a Botanist or Dendrologist, so I don't quite know the science behind it
    Last edited by brennan909; 10-08-2021 at 12:19 AM.

  4. #4

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    Thanks for taking the time and sharing with us. Would like to add a BNZ myself. Hopefully an SS Contract!! I been around awhile and recall the price of milsurps back in the 70s-80s were sure much cheaper but these items have really caught on with collectors and a diminishing surplus is noticed. Great to see three very desirable rifles.

  5. #5

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    Hey Mauser, yea I started collecting only a few years ago and not the best of times, prices and supply are an issue (gunbroker is just absurd these days). I had a BNZ 41 RC I bought for 650 about 5 years ago... I haven't seen them less than 1000 these days. Interestingly enough, some posts/articles suggest that the rifle I had may have been a leftover contract rifle or planned contract rifle. (Its definitely a Heer rifle, as it has the 623 WaA) It lacks the Radom markings, which makes sense because Radom was taken back by the soviets in later 44, so BNZ went back to the Gusen concentration Camp (where the contract rifles were made) and pretty much took over what they could. Supposedly, the double digit 44 is an indicator of a contract rifle , as the Radom made receivers only carried a single digit of 4 for 1944. This may all be hearsay, as I said Ive only ever seen it in forum posts and short articles. Sorry for k98 nerding!!!

  6. #6

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    Great looking arisaka with the mum intact which is pretty uncommon and I always loved the Finnish mosins, glad I picked one up a few years ago as I don’t see a whole lot around!

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